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Shedding Light on Home Energy

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Heating and Cooling1

47% of your home's energy
HVAC

Tax Credits & Rebates

Walls, Windows & Doors

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Laundry

6% of your home's energy
save energy

Smart Thermostats

Lighting

6% of your home's energy
save energy

Air Sealing & Insulation

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Always-On Appliances

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Refrigeration2

10% of your home's energy
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Cooking4

3% of your home's energy
save energy

Entertainment3

6% of your home's energy
save energy

Energy Audits

Your Electric Cooperative

Water Heating

21% of your home's energy
HVAC

Home Solar

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Where do I use energy?

Lose Energy

Where do I lose energy?

Energy

Where can I find more savings?

Boost your efficiency and save

Did you know that the biggest factor that influences your power bill isn’t usually fees or rates – it’s how much electricity your family uses. It changes with the weather, the devices you use, and how you use them. Understanding your home’s energy use can reveal ways to save on your electricity bills. Central Electric understands that every dollar counts, and we’re here to help you keep your bill low without compromising your family’s comfort.

It’s important to understand what kind of energy powers your home’s appliances – like HVAC, water heater, clothes dryer and oven. The tips and resources here are designed to help you save on energy costs regardless of fuel source, but if you use electricity to power these devices, changing your behaviors can result in a lower electricity bill.

For more tips on using energy efficiently in your home, visit CEMCpower.com.

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Where do I use energy?

Heating and Cooling1 – 47% of your home’s energy

 

In NC, we experience the beauty of all four seasons. When it’s hot or cold, your heating and cooling systems have to work harder to keep you comfortable. And since your HVAC* system is the biggest energy consumer in your house, the outside temperature can really affect your energy costs.

 

Water heating – 21% of your home’s energy

 

Your water heater works hard to provide hot water for showers and chores throughout the day. And that hot water takes a lot of energy – maybe more than you think! Conserving hot water with low flow shower heads and cold wash cycles can help.

 

Refrigeration2 – 10% of your home’s energy

 

About 1 out of every $10 on your power bill goes toward keeping it cool in your fridge and freezer to preserve food freshness. Multiple refrigerators, large freezers, and badly sealed doors can drive this cost up – as can older, inefficient appliances.

 

Lighting – 6% of your home’s energy

 

Whether it’s a good book under a lamp or string lights on the patio with family, lighting uses electricity. But maybe not as much as you think – especially if you use efficient bulbs and fixtures!

 

Laundry – 6% of your home’s energy

 

North Carolina is known for unpredictable weather, but that doesn’t stop us from going outside! That can mean a lot of messy laundry – and a lot of hard work for your washer and dryer.

 

Entertainment3 – 6% of your home’s energy

 

Everybody loves family movie night! TVs, consoles, streaming devices, surround sound – all of these can contribute to your household electricity use.

 

Cooking4 – 3% of your home’s energy

 

The kitchen is the heart of the home. From ovens to stovetops, kitchen appliances consume energy regularly, especially during colder months when warm, hearty dishes are preferred.

 

Lose Energy

Where do I lose energy?

Walls, Windows & Doors1

With HVAC being the biggest contributor to your bill, a drafty opening or a leaky door can mean money flying out the window! But remember that it can take a while for big investments with small results, like all-new windows, to pay off.

 

Air Sealing & Insulation

Good insulation is like a warm blanket for your house, but if it’s old or worn thin, you might be heating the great outdoors. The same goes for summertime – keeping the nicely conditioned air inside your home is always a great plan for savings.

 

Always-On2 Appliances

Whether it’s a spinning ceiling fan in an empty room or a game console on standby, appliances can use electricity even when we aren’t using them. Turn off items you aren’t using and consider a smart power strip or a more efficient appliance to save without sacrifice.

Energy

Where can I find more savings?

Smart Thermostats

Smart home devices, like thermostats and lighting, can optimize your home’s energy use by automatically adjusting to match your family’s habits. This can reduce energy use and lower your power costs over time.

 

Home Solar

Whether you’re just getting started or have thoroughly researched solar energy, be sure to connect with your local co-op. Unfortunately, there is misleading information available about residential solar, but your co-op is here to help you to arrive at a decision right for your home and personal goals.

 

Energy Audits3

Work with your electric cooperative to evaluate your home’s energy usage and identify where improvements can be made. By finding inefficiencies like air leaks, outdated appliances, or inadequate insulation, energy audits can lead to savings in the long run.

 

Tax Credits4 & Rebates

These incentives can help you save big on upgrades and replacements around your home, and can mean a lower power bill in the long run. Explore what might be available to you, including HVAC, water heaters, windows and more.

 

Your Electric Cooperative

When it comes to finding savings, your local electric cooperative is here to help you! One of the benefits of being a member is access to friendly staff who live in your community. We are ready to help you manage your electricity costs as best as possible. Please reach out to us by phone or email to speak with a member of our team.

For more tips on using energy efficiently in your home, visit CEMCpower.com.

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Source: U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS)

* HVAC stands for Heating, Ventilation, and Air Conditioning. This refers to the use of various technologies to control the temperature, humidity, and purity of the air in an enclosed space.

  1. Includes space heating, air conditioning, and evaporators for heating/cooling.
  2. Includes all refrigerators and separate freezers.
  3. Includes TVs and peripherals such as cable and satellite boxes, DVRs, Internet streaming devices, video game consoles, DVD or Blu-ray players, VCRs, and home theater or audio systems.
  4. Cooking includes ranges (units with both a cooktop and an oven), separate cooktops, and separate ovens. Microwaves, small kitchen appliances, and outdoor cooking are excluded.
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