NCEC logo

Discover your home’s energy users and losers

Tap on any icon below to get started

M

Heating & Cooling

47% of your home's energy High User

In North Carolina, we experience the beauty of all four seasons. When it's hot or cold, your heating and cooling systems have to work harder to keep you comfortable. And since your HVAC* system is the biggest energy consumer in your house, the outside temperature can really affect your energy costs.

M

Tax Credits & Rebates

These incentives can help you save big on upgrades and replacements around your home and can mean a lower power bill in the long run. Explore what incentives might be available to you, including for your HVAC, water heater, windows and more.

M

Walls, Windows & Doors

medium User

With HVAC being the biggest contributor to your bill, a drafty opening or a leaky door can mean money flying out the window! But remember that it can take a while for big investments with small results, like all-new windows, to pay off.

M

Laundry

6% of your home's energy Low User

North Carolina is known for unpredictable weather, but that doesn’t stop us from going outside! That can mean a lot of messy laundry – and a lot of hard work for your washer and dryer.

M

Smart Thermostats

Smart home devices, like thermostats, can optimize your home's energy use by automatically adjusting to match your family’s habits. This can reduce energy use and lower your power costs over time.

M

Lighting

6% of your home's energy Low User

Whether it’s a good book under a lamp or string lights on the patio with family, lighting uses electricity. But maybe not as much as you think – especially if you use efficient bulbs and fixtures!

M

Air Sealing & Insulation

medium User

Good insulation is like a warm blanket for your house, but if it's old or worn thin, you might be heating the great outdoors. The same goes for summertime – keeping the nicely conditioned air inside your home is always a great plan for savings.

M

Always-On Appliances

medium User

Whether it's a spinning ceiling fan in an empty room or a game console on standby, appliances can use electricity even when we aren’t using them. Turn off items you aren’t using and consider a smart power strip or a more efficient appliance to save without sacrifice.

M

Refrigeration

10% of your home's energy medium User

About 1 out of every $10 on your power bill goes toward keeping it cool in your fridge and freezer to preserve food freshness. Multiple refrigerators, large freezers and badly sealed doors can drive this cost up – as can older, inefficient appliances.

M

Cooking

3% of your home's energy Low User

The kitchen is the heart of the home. From ovens to stovetops, kitchen appliances consume energy regularly, especially during colder months when warm, hearty dishes are preferred.

M

Entertainment

6% of your home's energy Low User

Everybody loves family movie night! TVs, consoles, streaming devices, surround sound - all of these contribute to about 6% of your household energy use, but it sure beats the price of movie tickets and popcorn.

M

Energy Audits

Ask your electric cooperative about how you can evaluate your home's energy usage and identify where improvements can be made. By finding inefficiencies like air leaks, outdated appliances or inadequate insulation, energy audits can lead to savings in the long run.

M

Your Electric Cooperative

When it comes to finding savings, your local electric cooperative is here to help you! One of the benefits of being a member is access to friendly staff who live in your community. We are here to help you manage your home energy use and budget. Please reach out to us by phone or email to speak with a member of our team.

M

Water Heating

21% of your home's energyHigh User

Your water heater works hard to provide hot water for showers and chores throughout the day. And that hot water takes a lot of energy – maybe more than you think! Conserving hot water with low flow shower heads and cold wash cycles can help.

M

Home Solar

Whether you’re just getting started or have thoroughly researched solar energy, be sure to connect with your local co-op. Unfortunately, there is some misleading solar information available, but your co-op is here to support you in making a solar energy decision that is right for your home energy goals.

M

Electric Vehicles (EVs)

From a better driving experience to exciting technology and reduced emissions, electric vehicles are growing in popularity for good reason! EVs can also cost less to drive and maintain long-term than gas-powered vehicles.

M

Landscaping

Well-placed trees can provide shade in summer and block wind in winter, reducing the need to heat and cool your home. Just be careful not to plant near power lines!

energy icon

Energy Users

energy icon

Energy Losers

Energy

Energy Extras

Your co-op is here to help

The biggest factor affecting your power bill is how much electricity you use. This changes with the weather, the devices you use, and how you use them. Understanding your home’s energy use can reveal ways to save.

French Broad EMC knows every dollar counts. We’re here to help with advice and assistance on how to keep your bill low without compromising your family’s comfort.

energy icon

Energy Users

In North Carolina, we experience the beauty of all four seasons. When it's hot or cold, your heating and cooling systems have to work harder to keep you comfortable. And since your HVAC* system is the biggest energy consumer in your house, the outside temperature can really affect your energy costs. 

Your water heater works hard to provide hot water for showers and chores throughout the day. And that hot water takes a lot of energy – maybe more than you think! Conserving hot water with low flow shower heads and cold wash cycles can help.

 

About 1 out of every $10 on your power bill goes toward keeping it cool in your fridge and freezer to preserve food freshness. Multiple refrigerators, large freezers and badly sealed doors can drive this cost up – as can older, inefficient appliances. 

Whether it’s a good book under a lamp or string lights on the patio with family, lighting uses electricity. But maybe not as much as you think – especially if you use efficient bulbs and fixtures!

North Carolina is known for unpredictable weather, but that doesn’t stop us from going outside! That can mean a lot of messy laundry – and a lot of hard work for your washer and dryer.

 

Everybody loves family movie night! TVs, consoles, streaming devices, surround sound - all of these contribute to about 6% of your household energy use, but it sure beats the price of movie tickets and popcorn.

 

The kitchen is the heart of the home. From ovens to stovetops, kitchen appliances consume energy regularly, especially during colder months when warm, hearty dishes are preferred.

 
Lose Energy

Energy Losers

With HVAC being the biggest contributor to your bill, a drafty opening or a leaky door can mean money flying out the window! But remember that it can take a while for big investments with small results, like all-new windows, to pay off.

Good insulation is like a warm blanket for your house, but if it's old or worn thin, you might be heating the great outdoors. The same goes for summertime – keeping the nicely conditioned air inside your home is always a great plan for savings.

Whether it's a spinning ceiling fan in an empty room or a game console on standby, appliances can use electricity even when we aren’t using them. Turn off items you aren’t using and consider a smart power strip or a more efficient appliance to save without sacrifice.

Energy

Energy Extras

Smart home devices, like thermostats, can optimize your home's energy use by automatically adjusting to match your family’s habits. This can reduce energy use and lower your power costs over time.

Whether you’re just getting started or have thoroughly researched solar energy, be sure to connect with your local co-op. Unfortunately, there is some misleading solar information available, but your co-op is here to support you in making a solar energy decision that is right for your home energy goals.

Ask your electric cooperative about how you can evaluate your home's energy usage and identify where improvements can be made. By finding inefficiencies like air leaks, outdated appliances or inadequate insulation, energy audits can lead to savings in the long run.

These incentives can help you save big on upgrades and replacements around your home and can mean a lower power bill in the long run. Explore what incentives might be available to you, including for your HVAC, water heater, windows and more.

 

From a better driving experience to exciting technology and reduced emissions, electric vehicles are growing in popularity for good reason! EVs can also cost less to drive and maintain long-term than gas-powered vehicles.


Well-placed trees can provide shade in summer and block wind in winter, reducing the need to heat and cool your home. Just be careful not to plant near power lines!


When it comes to finding savings, your local electric cooperative is here to help you! One of the benefits of being a member is access to friendly staff who live in your community. We are here to help you manage your home energy use and budget. Please reach out to us by phone or email to speak with a member of our team.


ccec logo

It’s important to understand what kind of energy powers your home’s appliances. The tips and resources here are designed to help you save on energy costs regardless of fuel source, but if you use electricity to power these devices, changing your behaviors can result in a lower electricity bill.

Source: U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS)

* HVAC stands for Heating, Ventilation, and Air Conditioning. This refers to the use of various technologies to control the temperature, humidity, and purity of the air in an enclosed space.

  1. Includes space heating, air conditioning, and evaporators for heating/cooling.
  2. Includes all refrigerators and separate freezers.
  3. Includes TVs and peripherals such as cable and satellite boxes, DVRs, Internet streaming devices, video game consoles, DVD or Blu-ray players, VCRs, and home theater or audio systems.
  4. Cooking includes ranges (units with both a cooktop and an oven), separate cooktops, and separate ovens. Microwaves, small kitchen appliances, and outdoor cooking are excluded.
6